Places of Interest in Great Britain








Places of Interest in Great Britain ..3

British literature ..3

Christmas in Great Britain ..3

British Museums .4

Newspapers in Britain .4








Places of Interest in Great Britain

Britain is rich in its historic places which link the present with the past.

The oldest part of London is Lud Hill, where the city is originated. About a mile west of it there is Westminster Palace, where the king lived and the Parliament met, and there is also Westminster Abbey, the coronation church.

Liverpool, the city of ships, is Englands second greatest port, ranking after London. The most interesting sight in the Liverpool is the docks. They occupy river frontage of seven miles. The University of Liverpool, established in 1903, is noted for its School of Tropical Medicine. And in the music world Liverpool is a well-known name, for its the home town of The Beatles.

Stratford-on-Avon lies 93 miles north-west of London. Shakespeare was born here in 1564, and here he died in 1616. Cambridge and Oxford Universities are famous centres of learning. Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument, presumably built by Druids, members of an order of priests in ancient Britain. Tintagel Castle is King Arthurs reputed birthplace. Canterbury Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, head of the Church of England. The British Museums is the largest and richest museum in the world. It was founded in 1753 and contains one of the worlds richest collections of antiquities. The Egyptian Galleries contain human and animal mummies. Some parts of Athens Parthenon are in the Greek section. Madam Tussauds Museum is an exhibition of hundreds of life-size wax models of famous people of yesterday and today. The collection was started by Madam Tussaud, a French modeler. In wax, in the 18th century. Here you can meet Marilyn Monroe, Elton John, Picasso, the Royal Family, the Beatles and many others: writers, movie stars, singers, politicians, sportsmen, etc.

British literature

Great Britain gave the world a lot of talented people. Many famous writers and lived in Great Britain. One of the best known English playwrights was William Shakespeare. He draws ideas for his tragedies and comedies from the history of England and ancient Rome. Many experts consider Shakespeare the greatest playwright in English language. William Shakespeare wrote 37 plays which may be divided into: comedies (such as A Midsummer Nights Dream), tragedies (such as Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth) and historical plays (such as Richard 2, Henry 5, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra). Robert Burns represents the generation of Romantic writers. In his poems he described of Romantic writers. In his poems he described with love and understanding the simple life he knew. Among his well-known poems are Halloween, The Jolly Beggars, To a Mouse. Lord George Gordon Byron. His free-spirited life style combined with his rare poetic gift makes him one of the most famous figures of the Romantic Era. His famous works such as Stanzas to Augusta, The Prisoner of Chillon, Childe Harolds Pilgrimage, Manfred draw readers into the passion, humors and conviction of a poet whose life and work truly embodied the Romantic spirit. Sir Walter Scott Wrote the first examples of historical novel. Lewis Carroll became famous when he published Alices Adventures in Wonderland.

Christmas in Great Britain

For most British families, this is the most important festival of the year. This is the day when many people are traveling home to be with their families on Christmas Day. If you try to catch a train on 24th December you may have difficulty in finding a seat. There are a lot of traditions connected with Christmas butt the most important one is the giving of presents. Family members wrap up their gifts and leave them at the bottom of the Christmas tree to be bound on Christmas morning. At some time on Christmas Day the family will sit down to a big turkey dinner followed by Christmas pudding.

In the afternoon they may watch the Queen on the television as she delivers her traditional Christmas message to the United Kingdom and Commonwealth. Then they enjoy a piece of Christmas cake or eat a hot mince pie. On the Sunday before Christmas many churches hold a service where special hymns are sung. Sometimes singers can be heard on the streets as they collect money for charity. Most families decorate their houses with brightly-coloured paper or holly, and they usually have a Christmas tree in the corner of the room, glittering with coloured lights and decoration. 26th December is also a public holiday, called Boxing Day. This is the time to visit friends and relatives or be a spectator at one of the many sporting events.

Everyone in Great Britain is waiting and enjoying this holiday very much!

British Museums

There are many museums in London. One of them is them is the Tate Gallery in Millmank, which presents modern masters of England and France. There are some fine examples of modern sculpture. Its collection of French Impressionists is marvelous. There is the Victoria and Albert Museum in Brompton Road. It has an outstanding collection of the applied arts of all countries and periods. The National Gallery in Trafalgar Square has one of the best picture collections in the world. It has the most valuable display of French paintings from the early of the Impressionists, and, of course, the finest English painting, with Gainsborough, Turner, Constable and others. It shows the progress of Italian painting from the medieval to the Renaissance, some outstanding pictures of the old Roman masters. It also has a great variety of Dutch and Flemish masters and an excellent choice of Spanish painters. There are great treasures dispersed in private collections all over the world. The Queens collection is the most valuable among them.

Newspapers in Britain

If you get on a bus or catch a train in Britain, especially during the morning and evening rush hour, youll see a lot of people reading newspapers. The press tells us about various political views, interest and levels of education. Papers are usually divided into quality papers which are serious with long, informative articles and popular which have smaller size. They are less serious and contain more human interest stories than news.

More daily newspapers, national and regional are sold in Great Britain than in most other developed countries. There are about 135 daily papers and Sunday papers, 2000 weekly papers and about 100 papers produced by members of ethnic groups.

A lot of people buy a morning paper, an evening paper and a couple of Sunday papers. On an average day two out of three people over the age of 15 read a national morning paper, about three out of four read a Sunday paper. So its not surprising to learn that national newspapers have a circulation of 15.8 million copies on weekdays and 19 million on Sundays.

Newspapers are almost always financially independent of any political party. However, during general election campaigns many papers recommend their readers to vote for a particular political party. Ownership of the national London and regional daily newspapers is concentrated in the hands of large press publishing groups.

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